Saturday, December 29, 2012

Math is Fun for Little Ones!

There are lots of great ways to introduce your baby or kidlet to numbers. You can start with some fun books that feature numbers and counting.  For babies try these board books:  Baby's Numbers by Karen Katz, which features large colorful drawing of familiar objects to illustrate each number, or 1-2-3 Dinosaurs Bite! by Steve Jenkins, where jaggedy parts of each page are missing, ostensibly by hungry dinosaurs. 

Toddlers will enjoy Peter Maloney's One Foot Two Feet: an EXCEPTIONal counting book, where die-cut windows frame one object and a turn of the page reveals a group of them. Or try Laura Seeger's One Boy, where the die-cut does double duty, both to frame the number of objects as well as to make a play on words. The surprise ending will undoubtedly spur your child to enjoy the book all over again!
Older children never tire of the classic The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle which introduces days of the week as well as incrementally increasing bites of food by the insatiable caterpillar.  For something new, try Anno's Counting Book by Mitsumasa Anno, a wordless picture book that offers the child something to count on each page while revealing an ever-changing, ever-growing scene. Another engaging read is One is a Snail; Ten is a Crab: a counting by feet book by April Pulley Sayre. Just try to read this one without counting the feet of the animals shown! 
And when you're done with reading, zoom off to the moon with this fun clapping countdown chant:
 Zoom, zoom, zoom,
We're going to the moon.
Zoom, zoom, zoom,
We're going to the moon.
If you'd like to take a trip,
Climb aboard my rocketship.
Zoom, zoom, zoom,
We're going to the moon.
5,-4,-3,-2,-1
Blastoff! 
(On "blastoff", lift baby above your head or jump up with your young one).

-Miss Meg

No comments:

Post a Comment

What can I post on your wall?
Commenting & Posting Guidelines

Welcome to your library on social media!

Pima County Public Library (PCPL) offers blogs and other social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter for educational, cultural, civic, customer service, and recreational purposes. They provide a limited (or designated) public forum to facilitate the sharing of ideas, opinions, and information about library-related subjects and issues.

By choosing to comment or post on our social media accounts, you agree with the following:

Comments and posts are moderated by library staff, and the library reserves the right to remove any that are unlawful or off topic. Posts containing the following may be deleted:
Copyright violations
Off-topic comments
Commercial material/spam/solicitation
Sexual content, or links to sexual content
Threatening or harassing postings
Libelous or other kinds of personal attacks
Conduct or encouragement of illegal activity
Content that reveals private, personal information without permission
Vulgar language or content
Comments in support of or in opposition to political campaigns or ballot measures
Content that degrades others on the basis of gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability or other classification

P.S. Protect your privacy. Don't post personally identifying information in these public spaces, including details like your library card number, phone number, or medical information, etc.

Young people under age 18, especially, should not post information such as your school, age, phone number, and address.

Post a Comment